Led Light Therapy

We all know that sunlight affects the production of vitamin D and that people in the dark north treat seasonal affective disorder with bright lamps. Civilizations throughout history have acknowledged the healing power of light. The father of modern medicine, Hippocratus, recommended sitting in the sun to treat various illnesses. At the end of 19th century, light therapy was successfully used as a treatment for tuberculosis, after which the first artificial light therapy lamps were invented.

With LED technology, specific wavelengths of light can be harnessed to treat the body. Basically the light penetrates the skin to certain depth in which the cells can use it for energy. This and other effects on cellular functions enhance the production of collagen and other proteins. Therefore, led light therapy can reduce inflammation, boost metabolism and aid recovery after performance.

 

Red Light

Bodypioneer’s collagen lamp utilises the red light with a wavelength of 620nm. The light is easily absorbed and especially affects the skin’s protein production, which promotes the natural production of collagen as well. This makes the skin firmer, reduces wrinkles and can prevent cellulite.

Red light therapy has been found to aid in

 

What is collagen?

One third of body’s protein is collagen. It is primarily found in skin, bones and connective tissue and it makes the skin elastic, helps in wound healing and maintains healthy cartilage. It’s fibrous structure forms a strong shield around the internal organs.

As we get older, the collagen protein in our bodies starts to decline. This causes wrinkles and sluggish skin and might cause joint pain since tendons and bones won’t be able to move without friction. Because red light therapy activates the production of collagen, it helps with issues connected to it’s decline.

Led light therapy doesn’t produce harmful radiation or heat and works best on bare skin.

 

 

Text: Liisa Oikkonen

Photo: Leigh Ewin

Liisa is Bodypioneer’s energetic customer service person. She holds a degree in arts (dance/movement) and is always interested in exploring new forms of fitness. On her days off, you can find Liisa hiking, climbing or meditating in nature.
 

 

Sources:

www.alexfergus.com/blog/everything-you-need-to-know-about-red-light-therapy#1

www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/262881.php