Infrared heat is making it’s way to the hottest trends of fitness in 2019. Infrared is known to help aid muscle soreness, improve circulation, boost metabolism and relieve stress.

Infrared for muscle pain

The heat of infrared rays can penetrate as far as 4-7cm deep into the tissue of a human body. The heat aids muscle pain by softening the tissue and relaxing the muscles. It also increases the blood flow towards the muscles, carrying oxygen and nutrients which helps the body heal faster.

Beauty benefits of infrared heat

The increased blood flow from infrared rays accelerates the renewal of skin cells. You will experience the skin feeling softer and firmer after continuous use. The low pH value of our body’s sweat our body is able to prevent bacteria from the surface of the skin, therefore taking care of the cleanliness and purified feeling on our skin after exposure to infrared heat.

Infrared and weight loss

When exposed to infrared heat, our body aims to cool itself down by producing sweat. To produce sweat, our body is required to work harder: thermoregulation of our body increases the hearth rate, which in turn increases blood flow and our sweat glands activate to produce liquid to cool down the surface of the skin.

Infrared for mental wellbeing

Infrared heat has been proven to increase the amount of feel good hormones in the body such as dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline. Anxiousness, sleep disorders, depression and digestive problems can be signs of low serotonin levels, for which infrared treatments can provide a beneficial aid. In Nordic countries, the winter seasons can be cold, dark and last for long periods of time, during which we need to benefit from artificial forms of heat and light therapy.

If you want to try the benefits of infrared for yourself, we recommend that you check out our innovative fitness devices which provide the ultimate infrared experience combined with a compact exercise of just 30 minutes.

 


 

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